Monday, March 31, 2014

Sharing goodness

Three things that came across the radar on Sunday and well worth sharing.

1 - collaboration takes courage and trust. Watch carefully as each continue to communicate as they perform together.




Love the collaboration!


2 - Brene Brown's TED talk and discussion with Jonathan Fields are ones I frequently turn to or recommend. This posting from the OnBeing blog summarizes the steps to be ready for giving and sharing feedback.

I know I am ready to give feedback when:

  • I'm ready to sit next to you rather than across from you.


  • I'm willing to put the problem in front of us rather than between us (or sliding it toward you).


  • I'm ready to listen ask questions, and accept that I may not fully understand the issue.


  • I want to acknowledge what you do well instead of picking apart your mistakes.


  • I recognize your strengths and how you can use them to address your challenges.


  • I can hold you accountable without shaming or blaming you.


  • I'm willing to own my part.


  • I can genuinely thank you for your efforts rather than criticize you for your failings.


  • I can talk about how resolving these challenges will lead to your growth and opportunity.


  • I can model the vulnerability and openness that I expect to see from you.

  • OBeing article
    http://www.onbeing.org/blog/grace-in-disagreement/6191

    Good Life Project
    http://www.goodlifeproject.com/brene-brown-vulnerable/

    Brene Brown's TED Talk
    http://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_listening_to_shame


     3 - and finally on the food front, what we eat does provide us the capability to do everything else we do. This article in the Atlantic reports on the scientific results of all the various food diets. Very good reading. I encourage you to check out the full article. Along the way, you'll find that Dr Katz is behind the NuVal scoring system used by the BigY markets.

    The current review is in pursuit of that, as is a system for determining the nutritional value of foods that Katz recently spent two years developing. It's called NuVal, and it offers consumers a single numeric value to determine foods' worth, as opposed to a complex nutritional panel. The number does things like differentiate intrinsic from added nutrients. "If you don’t do that, the best thing in the whole damn food supply is Total cereal. Total is basically a completely vapid flake delivery system for multivitamins. You could skip the cereal and take the multivitamin." 
    "If you eat food direct from nature," Katz added, "you don’t even need to think about this. You don't have to worry about trans fat or saturated fat or salt—most of our salt comes from processed food, not the salt shaker. If you focus on real food, nutrients tend to take care of themselves."

    Atlantic article

    NuVal at BigY

    NuVal homepage